“Just another guy with a blog.  No big whoop.”

October 15, 2009

The Beauty and Majesty of Liturgical Dance

I must say, this is one of the more sophisticated and expressive examples of liturgical dance I have seen over the years. The aesthetic value of the song which the dancer interprets in this video is amply betokened by his movements.

11 comments:

  1. Classic, simply classic. A masterpiece in interpretive dance.

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  2. About 8-9 years ago I was at a benedictine monastery up north for the Pascal Triduum. On Holy Thursday's liturgy, some of the benedictine sisters erupted in their dresses and tutus with tambourines, and jumping about not too diferently from this fellow. It was appalling. Lord save us from liturgical dancers...
    Thanks for the good laugh.

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  3. Surely your tongue is in your cheek??or (*s)

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  4. This is great! All those who have encouraged the abomination of liturgical dance should be forced to watch this video as a reality check. A masterpiece of interpretation indeed! :-)

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  5. Hmm. I think I heard that this dance was performed at the Los Angeles Religious Education Conference. All kidding aside, it wouldn't surprise me! Thanks for making me smile (sort of) on an otherwise all-too-serious Thursday. Patrick, you're the best - next to Stephen Colbert, of course.

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  6. almost as bad as the clown ministry...

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  7. Wow, I know a couple of suburban parishes that would welcome this guy. He could dance up the aisle as the head of the procession of little dancing girls while the cantor, Ms. Puggy Lea and her Liturgical Disciples rhythm band lead off with a rousing "King of Glory" or "Sing Out, Earth and Sky"! And just think what they could do at the Offertory. Chilling.

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  8. What happened to the puppets? There were supposed to be puppets!

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  9. This could really benefit from a bluegrass gitfiddle accompaniment in the background.

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  10. This is very timely. We usually have "King of Glory" on the Feast of Christ the King as processional or recessional.

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